Curtain Headings

Pencil Pleat

Pencil pleat heading is possibly the most well know curtain heading. This heading looks like a neat row of pencils and can be used in traditional or contemporary homes. To achieve this heading you need to multiply your pole/track length by 2 and then divide by the width of the fabric.

Double/Triple (pinch) pleat Heading

Double or triple pleat heading is by far the most popular heading with our customers and curtain makers. The pleats are formed by pinching/sewing the fabric at equidistant intervals so that they are always in the same place, this heading looks at home in either contemporary or traditional settings. To achieve this heading you need to multiply your pole length by 2.5 for triple pleat and 2 or 2.5 for double pleat depending on how full you want your curtains.

Eyelets

In our opinion eyelets work best in a more contemporary home and are designed solely to be used with poles. Eyelets are sewn into the top of the curtain and then simply threaded onto your chosen pole. Eyelet rings come in a number of colours and are usually matched to the colour of the pole. To achieve this heading you need to multiply your pole length by 2 and add 4cm onto the length of the curtains

Tab top

This is another more contemporary heading where the pole threads through tabs made out of the same fabric as the curtains forming soft folds. To achieve this heading you will need to multiply your pole length by 1.5.

Wave

Very popular here in the South West as this specialist system suits large expanses of glass due to the design of its track which allows fabric to stack neatly back at either side thereby maximising the view from your windows/doors. This system suits modern contemporary homes. It is best to consult the specialist companies that supply this tracking prior to ordering as they will be able to advise you of the exact amount of fabric you need. We do have local curtain makers who can help you with this.

 

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